Reading “Korea and her neighbors” – 6, Japan

 

To all intents and purposes the settlement of Fusan is Japanese. In addition to the Japanese population of 5,508, there 1 According to Mr. Hunt, the Commissioner of Customs at Fusan, in the Kyong-sang province alone there are 17 such stations. Fusan is hedged round by a cordon of them within a ten-mile radius, and on the Nak-tong, which is the waterway to the provincial capital, there are four in a distance of 25 miles. is a floating population of 8,000 Japanese fishermen. A Japanese Consul-General lives in a fine European house. Banking facilities are furnished by the Dai Ichi Gingo of Tokio, and the post and telegraph services are also Japanese. Japanese too is the cleanliness of the settlement, and the introduction of industries unknown to Korea, such as rice husking and cleaning by machinery, whale-fishing, sake-making, and the preparation of shark’s fins, deche de mer, and fish manure, the latter an unsavory fertilizer, of which enormous quantities are exported to Japan. But the reader asks impatiently, ”Where are the Koreans? I don’t want to read about the Japanese ! ” Nor do I want to write about them, but facts are stubborn, and they are the outstanding Fusan fact.

*”Fusan” is today’s Busan

Bird, Isabella L. (Isabella Lucy), 1831-1904. Korea and her neighbors; a narrative of travel, with an account of the recent vicissitudes and present position of the country (Kindle position No.408-415). New York, Chicago [etc.] F.H. Revell Co..

 

On the slope of Nam San the white wooden buildings, simple and unpretentious, of the Japanese Legation are situated, and Japanese Legation are situated, and below them a Japanese colony of nearly 5,000 persons, equipped with tea-houses, a theatre, and the various arrangements essential to Japanese well-being. There, in acute contrast to everything Korean, are to be seen streets of shops and houses where cleanliness, daintiness, and thrift reign supreme, and unveiled women, and men in girdled dressing-gowns and clogs, move about as freely as in Japan.

Bird, Isabella L. (Isabella Lucy), 1831-1904. Korea and her neighbors; a narrative of travel, with an account of the recent vicissitudes and present position of the country (Kindle position No.692-696). New York, Chicago [etc.] F.H. Revell Co..

You can read the book online or get PDF and Kindle book from here.

See: the pictures of before and after.

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