South Korea…GROW UP

Texts in blue are my comments.

Irreconcilable neighbor – The Korea Times

Posted : 2017-02-28 17:58
음성듣기
By Choi Sung-jin

Koreans cannot help but think about Japan at least twice a year ― on March 1 and August 15. And which of the two national holidays a person believes, more importantly, tells much about his or her historical and ideological inclinations.

Ninety-eight years ago today, 2 million Koreans (HAHAHA. Is it a official police estimates? or protesters self-claim? Because Koreans TODAY.. “Every Saturday night since Oct. 29, thousands of Koreans have poured onto a main artery in central Seoul to demand an end to the presidency of Park Geun-hye. Their numbers peaked at 1.6 million on Dec. 3, 2016. Even after Park was impeached in December, the rallies continued on. ”  Protesters always exaggerate the numbers even TODAY. I remember more Koreans protested against the US beef based on RUMORS just 10 years ago. Against beef, man..)  rose against the Japanese colonial rulers declaring and demanding the country’s independence. Imperial Japan ruthlessly suppressed the peaceful(Really? Didn’t they killed Policemen?), nonviolent popular revolt(Really? ), which, however, led to the spread of independence fights(independence fights?  Really?  It was VIOLENT right? no?which is it.), here and abroad(For example? proof ? any historical document?), under the leadership of the government-in-exile in China.(And doing what?exactly?)

The Constitution makes it clear the Republic of Korea inherits the spirit of the March 1 Independence Movement and the provisional government determines the origin of this modern republic in the two historic events.

(HAHAHA! OK, this is very important, people!  Just like the author, many many Koreans believe Korea fought AGAINST Japan for independence and gained it, but, in realty, Koreans at the time, voluntarily fought WITH Japanese AS Japanese. This clearly shows that Koreans can’t face the reality. And also, They created false history in order to self-legitimate against North Korea over the sovereignty in the peninsula. )

Therefore the so-called New Rightists who allege the ROK was born on Aug. 15, 1948, are denying the heroic struggles and self-sacrifices of many independence fighters while whitewashing the shameful acts of treachery committed by pro-Japanese collaborators, including former President Park Chung-hee. The late Park, the father of President Park Geun-hye whose power was suspended by the National Assembly, ruled South Korea for 18 years with an iron fist.

(HAHAHA! It is common knowledge in the world that South Korea is granted the independence by UN from the US rule(USAMGIK) and the South Korea was founded under UNTCOK. I call you the revisionist! I’m sure you would deny Korean independence from China(Sino) was GIVEN by Japan in 1895 . Korean’s claims Japanese Textbook is distorted but, fact is that it is Korean’s that is distorted. Did Korean textbook cover the Jeju masacre or   Bodo League massacre in detail? No.)

Korea has yet to clear away all the remnants of Japanese colonialism, as seen by the resurgence of historical revisionists.(I’m sure you can’t. If you did that, you can’t even READ anything)

But the purge of pro-Japanese(HAHAHA, if you wanna do that, you have to purge every single Koreans from the peninsula. even samsung) conservatives should not necessarily be the first task facing Korea today. Revisiting the past will tear the nation to pieces beyond repair(No, be brave! Face the truth! – sarcasm), and Koreans have far more urgent things to tackle (Yeah, no time to scream “apologize!!!”  and indulge in something that never happened more than 80 years ago! right?) – ensuring national security amid the increasingly uncertain global political climate and stabilizing people’s livelihood in this era of breakneck technological progress and resurgent trade protectionism. Now is the time to move forward, not backward.(Oh good. good)

The spirit of “reconciliation and healing” can hardly be applied to perpetrators of historical crimes,(then WHY the hell you want apologies in the first plaice) however, mainly because they remain unrepentant. (in your dream, man. Insecurity and inferiority complex. that’s what prevent Koreans to admit.)

Nothing shows this better than the ongoing diplomatic rows between Korea and Japan over Tokyo’s brazen demand to remove what it dubs as “comfort women statues,” which commemorate Korean girls and women forced to work as sexual slaves for Japanese soldiers during World War II.(Dude! you are moving backward! )

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his government cite the December 2015 agreement between the two governments. It called for Tokyo to issue an apology in the name of its premier, acknowledge the state’s involvement in recruiting the sex slaves(No, you idiot!  Tokyo acknowledged the involvement like “knowing the existence” and “usage” but NOT “recruiting” or cohesively doing so, never. Don’t spread lies, asshole.) and then pay 10 billion yen ($8.3 million) from the government’s budget as compensation. Under these conditions, Park’s diplomatic team agreed to bury the issue “finally and irreversibly.”

Even before the ink was dry, however, Tokyo reiterated no historical records backed up Imperial Japan’s involvement in the forced recruitment (Yeah, Japan has been saying so all along. I told you so in the above! You are contradicting yourself.) and the money was intended for humanitarian purposes, not compensation.(Yeah, because there is no legal responsibility for Japan for two reasons. 1: It is resolved in the treaty in 1965 “Agreement Between Japan and the Republic of Korea Concerning the Settlement of Problems in Regard to Property and Claims and Economic Cooperation” which was hidden from Korean public until 2005. Japanese knew it, but Koreans did not know which was not Japan’s fault.  2:Japan as a country did not recruit Comfort Women like I explained in this blog, therefore Japan cannot take accountable.Morally, yes. That’s why Japan has been apologizing. You get it?) Abe, who had his foreign minister read the apology on behalf of him, made it clear he had “not an iota of intention” to make a personal apology (because writing a personal letter is NOT IN THE AGREEMENT you IDIOT. When does the demand stop? forever? not enough? more? more?). Just a day after the agreement, Abe’s defense minister paid tribute to the Yasukuni Shrine where Japan’s fallen soldiers (What’s wrong with paying respect for the dead), including 14 Class-A war criminals (Japanese respect the dead, asshole. Not like Koreans), are memorialized, as if to demonstrate his government’s resolve not to care a chip for the momentary and expedient diplomatic concession.(in your dream, men. wake up)

You know, I’m sick and tired of reading these crap from Korea every day.

GROW UP.

Ordinary Koreans are still wondering what drove Seoul to such an idiotic accord, which seemed to include a hidden consent for removing the statue from its current site facing the Japanese embassy (NO. It is called “Treaty of Vienna”, you moron. It’s because violation of Vienna Convention. Stop spreading baseless rumors and conspiracy theory.). Two things seem all but certain, though: Park, who bet all on resolving the issue, was trapped by a self-set deadline. And the United States, bent on forming a trilateral front with its two Northeast Asian allies against a resurgent China, could have twisted Seoul’s arms to swallow Tokyo’s solution.(because South Korea is behaving like 2-year-old child)

Now Japan has disappeared from the stage of the comfort women controversy, leaving Korea mired in conflicts between the pros and cons of the accord (Not Japan’s fault, asshole. South Korea wanted it. But YOU wanted to accuse Japan forever and feel morally superior over Japan, right?). Yun Byung-se, Korea’s top diplomat, is parroting Japanese officials’ claim that the statue hinders the “well-being and dignity” of foreign diplomatic missions, earning the nickname of the “Japanese foreign minister.(Why distort. Why not just say “Pro-Japanese traitor”. That’s what’s Koreans are saying after all.)” But the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations restricts such cases to radical demonstrations in front of foreign diplomatic missions(Oh, so you knew about the treaty then. The 1961 Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations and 1963 Vienna Convention on Consular Relations They actually  states “any disturbance of the peace of [the diplomatic mission/consular post] or impairment of its dignity.”). If Japanese officials feel similar threats from a small, silent girl’s statue, it must be because their conscience was stung by it.(Huh? Do you really think there are no radical demonstrations? Many Koreans are gathering and harassing by chanting, putting all kinds of papers around, and camping near the statues and so on. Their ugliness of the behaviors qualifies as “radical”.)

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One can see how Japan is not fit to hold a candle to Germany, which has set up a Holocaust Memorial along with a $6-billion fund for its victims.(Japan did not try to exterminate Koreans in gas chambers. In contrast, Korean population went up like a crazy after Japan annexed and modernize Korea. And Korea became healthier, cleaner, well educated. Japan even liberated traditional Korean slaves(노비) etc. Taiwanese were doing  GREAT  too after Japan annexed Taiwan. Now there are many statues of Japanese in honor of Japanese who contributed to Taiwan. – Thank you Taiwan!) 

Korea’s next president should repeal ― or at least supplement ― the agreement. As Donald Trump has shown, international accords are for revision. In international relations, only countries that can put forth their positions fairly and squarely deserve due respect from others.(Whatever. You are, in fact, saying treaties can be broken. Who wants to deal with a country who constantly change rule of a game? Koreans are famous among Japanese as people who moves “Goal post” all the time.)

North Korea, of course, poses a common threat but the world must solve the problem peacefully, not militarily.(Take that to Kim Jong-Un who, reportedly, just assassinated his own brother with VX. What a fuck you talking about? Japan poses more thread than North Korea? Can’t solve problem with Japan without militarily?)

Koreans and Japanese may be much alike in appearance, but the old adversaries are too different in racial characteristics to reconcile with each other. Koreans are simple, emotional and straightforward while Japanese are more subtle, cool-headed and secretive.(Korean racial thing again. GROW UP.  Korean irrational attitude is one of racial characteristics too ? ‘come on.)

Nor should Koreans expect the U.S. to raise their hand in their rivalry with Japan. Washington has always stood on the side of Tokyo since as early as the late 19th century when it effectively permitted Japan’s colonization of Korea.(It’s not America’s fault, you idiot. Face the realty.)

In the not so distant future, Koreans might have to think of the French intellectual Jacques Attali’s imaginary scenario, which supposes all non-Anglo-Saxon forces in the world unite to face an alliance led by America, Britain — and Japan.

(OK, now, I only despair of Korean people.)

Choi Sung-jin is a contributing writer to The Korea Times.

Revisiting the past will tear the nation(South Korea) to pieces beyond repair (so let’s not talk about it)” but apologies from Japan is not acceptable because “(it) can hardly be applied to perpetrators of historical crimes“, so let’s forget about Korean history and beat the crap of Japan together! because NK has missiles China is Big Daddy but Japan would do no harm to us.  “an easy target” huh?

STOP complaining and THINK and SHOW how to MAKE your fucking country (both government and people) BETTER by yourself without indulging in pathetic victimization! for once in your history.

Japan’s patience is wearing thin.

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Korea has been like this for hundreds of years.

 

 

[UPDATE]

The Korea Times, as if they read this page, published a new article “Grow up, China”. What a joke.

Grow up, China
2017-03-03 16:52
http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/opinion/2017/03/202_225025.html

Trying to hide dog eating habit.. again

I have no right to accuse or judge whether it is right or wrong about other food cultures, but I can express a feeling of disgust.

Dogs Rescued From Korean Slaughterhouses Arrive In Long Island
February 27, 2017 7:04 PM

HUNTINGTON, N.Y. (CBSNewYork) — A long journey has come to a happy end for a group of dogs that arrived on Long Island today — their lives saved by international rescue groups moving dogs from slaughter houses in Korea to loving homes.

It’s a whole new world for the ten dogs who arrived Monday, rescued from certain death in the meat markets of South Korea.

“Over there they are not seen as pets,” Little Shelter CEO David Ceely tells CBS2’s Carolyn Gusoff. “It’s sort of like a commodity or food, there is no emotional attachment that we have here in America.”

But now, there’s plenty of emotional attachment in Long Island as they were welcomed by Little Shelter in Huntington, their hopeless lives now turned around.

The canines were plucked from Korean warehouses and farms where animal welfare groups say they were being bred for human consumption. The practice goes back centuries in parts of Asia, where dog meat is considered a delicacy and even medicinal.

The annual Dog Eating Festival in China has prompted international outrage over inhumane slaughtering practices.

Rescuers say they understand the cultural differences at play.

“We are not changing the world,” Little Shelter Special Programs Manager Arleen Leone says, “but if we have the opportunity to step in to help out and get some of them out, that’s what we want to do.”

Little Shelter spent $4,000 to fly the dogs from Seoul to the United States. Neutered with vaccinations, the ten dogs — ranging in age from six months to three years — will now be quarantined while they’re fully screened and vetted to be suburban backyard ready.

The dogs will be put up for adoption and placed in loving homes in about two weeks.

The Toronto based group Free Korean Dogs teamed up with Little Shelter for this particular rescue. The group says their goal is to end the Korean dog meat trade.

“The group says their goal is to end the Korean dog meat trade” I don’t think it’s gonna work as they hope.

South Korea closes biggest dog meat market in run-up to Olympics

Tuesday 28 February 2017 09.01 GMT

Animals at market in Seongnam were kept in inhumane conditions and killed using electrocution, hanging and beating

The shutters have started coming down at South Korea’s biggest dog meat market as the country seeks to head off international criticism over its practice of killing dogs for human consumption before it hosts the 2018 Winter Olympics.

Moran market in Seongnam sells more than 80,000 dogs, dead or alive, every year and accounts for about a third of South Korea’s dog meat consumption, according to local media.

On Monday, officials and traders began removing butchery facilities and cages in which live animals are kept before they are slaughtered. The decision to close the market came after animal welfare campaigners highlighted the inhumane conditions in which the animals were kept and the methods used to kill them: electrocution, hanging and beating.

I’ve known this Korean tradition/culture since 1988 Seoul Olympics. Back then, they also closed shops for a while to hide it from the world to see. But after the Olympics, nothing has really changed.

Is the End Near for South Korea’s Largest Dog Meat Market?

February 28, 2017

When South Koreans hear “Moran Market,” they usually think of one thing: dog meat.

Moran Market is the country’s largest distribution outlet for dog meat. Located in Seongnam just south of Seoul, it is home to 22 dog meat suppliers and facilities for caging and slaughtering dogs. Some 80,000 dogs are reportedly traded there for meat every year.

I don’t think it is near the End of Korea’s dog eating habit.

They will hide it, and move the market little bit, but the habit will go on.

It’s time for the US to “apologize” for falsely, unfairly accusing Japan.

The US Congress adopted the resolution against Japan’s Comfort Women in 2007.

https://www.congress.gov/bill/110th-congress/house-resolution/121

H.Res.121 – A resolution expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that the Government of Japan should formally acknowledge, apologize, and accept historical responsibility in a clear and unequivocal manner for its Imperial Armed Forces’ coercion of young women into sexual slavery, known to the world as “comfort women”, during its colonial and wartime occupation of Asia and the Pacific Islands from the 1930s through the duration of World War II.

However…. in 2014.

South Korea: Suit Against Government for Forced Prostitution after 1957
– The US Congress

http://www.loc.gov/law/foreign-news/article/south-korea-suit-against-government-for-forced-prostitution-after-1957/
(July 9, 2014) On June 25, 2014, 122 women sued the Korean government, claiming that they were forced to engage in sexual intercourse for money for members of the United States military who were stationed in Korea after the Korean War cease-fire in 1957. (Toru Higashioka, Former “Comfort Women” Serving U.S. Military File Damages Lawsuit, ASAHI SHINBUN (June 28, 2014).)

The involvement of the Korean government in the prostitution around U.S. military bases only slowly became public knowledge. (KATHARINE H.S. MOON, SEX AMONG ALLIES (1997); Sang-hun Choe, Ex-Prostitutes Say South Korea and U.S. Enabled Sex Trade Near Bases, NY TIMES (Jan. 7, 2009).) In 2012, the Gender Equality and Family Committee of the National Assembly asked the Ministry of Gender Equality & Family to investigate the issue and establish a policy. However, the Ministry did not send the result of the investigation to the Committee. Because the government did not do anything to further the investigation, the plaintiffs and their support groups decided to file the lawsuit. (“Camp Town Women Control” Disclosure of Document Signed by Park Chung-hee [in Korean], HANKYOREH (Nov. 6, 2013).)

Some evidence of the government’s involvement was found recently. In 2013, National Assembly member Sung-hui Yu submitted to the Committee a document, “Camp Town Clean-up Measures,” that was created by the administrative affairs department of the President’s Office in April 1957 and signed by the former President, Park Chung-hee, on May 2, 1957. The document stated that 9,935 women lived in 62 camp towns (villages around U.S. military bases). The document proposed measures to work toward:

eradication of sexually transmitted diseases;
improvement of conditions in the villages;
provision of clean water; and
other steps. (Id.)
At a press conference about the lawsuit, members of support groups stated that some of the 122 women went to the camp towns because they were poor and could not make a living otherwise after the war. Some of them were sent there through human trafficking. They were forced by violent means to sell their bodies to American soldiers. The government exploited them in order to earn U.S. dollars. The plaintiffs are seeking an apology from the government and approximately US$10,000 each in damages. The supporters explained that the amount was decided somewhat randomly, because it was necessary to specify an amount for the litigation. (“Camp Town Women’s” Group Files Lawsuits for Damages Against the Government [in Korean], YONHAP NEWS (June 25, 2014).)

Author: Sayuri Umeda

Topic: Crimes against women, Human trafficking

Jurisdiction: South Korea

Date: July 9, 2014

‘Comfort women’ who serviced US soldiers demand justice
September 11, 2014 · 4:19 AM UTC

South Korea — Growing up in hardship in this once-poor Cold War outpost, the young Kim Kyeong-sun decades ago met a job recruiter who promised her housing and a paycheck to support her family.

Her real job? A sex worker for American GIs.

In a former neon-lit shantytown right outside an army base entrance, the hostess eked out a living flirting and trysting with soldiers who rotated in and out of South Korea. Descending into a life of hard drugs and debt, she sought a way out through marriage with a customer. Nuptials with American servicemen were a common escape from indentured sex servitude, she recalled.

But her man later abandoned her and their child.

This “keejichon” — the Korean term for a gray and grubby “army base town” — has closed shop. But the prostitutes who once lingered here continue to be treated as untouchables, derided as “Yankee whores” and “UN ladies.”

“I have so many regrets. Life was so hard,” Kim said.

Who’s to blame?

It’s not entirely the fault of US soldiers, she argues, many of whom were young, fun-loving and surprisingly innocent men. Rather, Kim points the finger at another alleged culprit: the South Korean government, which she argues backhandedly encouraged this largely illegal trade.

She joins 121 other “comfort women” in a $1.2 million lawsuit that’s expected to go to trial soon.

Each former sex worker seeks close to $10,000 in damages, an apology, and an investigation into the government’s alleged encouragement of the activity. The compensation may be minimal, but more meaningful is the message that victory would send, potentially amounting to an admission of government responsibility for coerced prostitution that served the US military.

No one is claiming that government agents literally pimped out young women to horny American soldiers. South Korea formally banned the sex trade in the early 1960s, but permitted activities in designated red-light districts at certain times, say scholars and activists.

It wasn’t until 2004 that South Korea passed a law doling out harsher punishments for the procurement of prostitution, falling in line with international standards.

The lawsuit alleges that, since 1957, poor and undereducated South Korean women were pressured into prostitution in those government-designated zones around American military bases. Authorities should be legally held responsible because they turned a blind eye and therefore promoted the trade, according to the filing.

Former prostitutes say that the government rounded up bar workers — some of whom were girls in their mid-teens — and mandated that they undergo forced STD testing. The ones who tested positive for diseases were held against their will in quarantine and treatment centers, say the plaintiffs. “It was terrible. And we believe that the government was responsible for its negligence,” said Kim, the former sex worker, who was tested multiple times.

The government also sponsored etiquette and English-language classes for these hostesses, where they were praised for contributing to economic development and national security.

Scholars say the South Korean government, run by three dictators from the 1960s to 1980s, sought to please the US military out of fear that it would depart, while bringing in US dollars to buttress this struggling economy. In the past, the South Korean government has denied encouraging prostitution. The Ministry of Gender Equality and Family would not comment on the litigation.

More from GlobalPost: The Sewol ferry disaster and South Korea’s culture of shame

In the early 1970s, the White House ordered a reduction of the American military presence in South Korea, pushing the sex trade into decline.

So why bring a controversial and scorching lawsuit forward now, decades after these women left the sex industry?

Previously, a history of stigma stopped them from going public, and the nation’s once-fledgling democracy movement didn’t pay attention to their plight until the late 1980s, say lawyers representing the case. “Only recently could they openly come out and talk about their experiences,” said Ha Ju-hee, a lawyer at the Justice and Peace Law Group, the nonprofit that represents the former prostitutes in court.

“Women who were involved in prostitution around US military bases have largely been ignored by our society until now,” she said. Planning for the litigation, and getting the victims on board, has taken a few years.

At first, many former “comfort women” were uneasy about coming forward, the attorney added. Later, “they realized that this issue isn’t strictly a personal problem, but rather a structural one that stemmed from a lack of governmental support for their basic rights.”

But experts raise questions over the use of the term “comfort women” to describe these former sex workers, which they say is a way of raising public attention.

The label “comfort women” usually refers to sex slaves exploited by Japanese soldiers during World War II, a heated and sensitive topic because those elderly women, too, seek compensation from the Japanese government.

Japan committed a number of crimes against humanity during its occupation of the Korean peninsula before and during World War II, including the enslavement of Korean women to entertain its soldiers.

“My guess is that they chose to frame the US military prostitution issue to ride the coattails of the Japanese ‘comfort women’ or ‘jeongsindae’ movement,” said Katharine Moon, the Korea studies chair at the Brookings Institution, and the author of “Sex Among Allies: Military Prostitution in Korea-US Relations.”

“They could have assumed — I have no proof — that there might be public sympathy or understanding, since the Japanese ‘comfort women’ issue is well-known nationally and internationally,” she said. “But I think it was a mistake to choose that term. It undercuts the jeongsindae case and confuses the public.”

In 1953, Korean War hostilities were halted, but military prostitution continues to rattle this nation, home to 28,500 American servicemen. Some left-wing South Korean lawmakers have found a cause celebre calling for a tougher stance on alleged crimes by US servicemen, and by accusing American bases of environmental degradation since the mid 1990s.

The movement reached its zenith a decade ago, when South Korea was home to a series of passionate, widespread protests calling on the American military to clean up its act — fueled in part by a 2002 tragedy in which an armored vehicle ran over two schoolgirls. Even today, a handful of nightlife hangouts bar American soldiers from their premises.

Over the past few years, the US Forces Korea, the official name of the military presence, has countered with an about-face, enforcing stronger curfews, the occasional alcohol ban, and harsher punishments for servicemen caught indulging in the sex trade.

Filipina and occasionally Russian women now populate the majority of the hostess bars of Dongducheon, Uijeongbu and Pyeongtaek, three cities that are home to notorious red-light districts for American personnel. Upon arrival to their new jobs, a few of these grungy saloons seize the women’s passports — which according to some experts makes them trafficked.

Here is Korean news article on this.

http://www.huffingtonpost.kr/2015/11/07/story_n_8501946.html
(In Korean)

http://www.huffingtonpost.jp/2015/11/09/comfort-women-in-korea_n_8508334.html
(Japanese traslation)

And even,

GIs Frequented Japan’s ‘Comfort Women’ – The Associated Press

Wednesday, April 25, 2007; 9:45 PM
TOKYO — Japan’s abhorrent practice of enslaving women to provide sex for its troops in World War II has a little-known sequel: After its surrender _ with tacit approval from the U.S. occupation authorities _ Japan set up a similar “comfort women” system for American GIs.

An Associated Press review of historical documents and records _ some never before translated into English _ shows American authorities permitted the official brothel system to operate despite internal reports that women were being coerced into prostitution. The Americans also had full knowledge by then of Japan’s atrocious treatment of women in countries across Asia that it conquered during the war.

Tens of thousands of women were employed to provide cheap sex to U.S. troops until the spring of 1946, when Gen. Douglas MacArthur shut the brothels down.
The documents show the brothels were rushed into operation as American forces poured into Japan beginning in August 1945.

“Sadly, we police had to set up sexual comfort stations for the occupation troops,” recounts the official history of the Ibaraki Prefectural Police Department, whose jurisdiction is just northeast of Tokyo. “The strategy was, through the special work of experienced women, to create a breakwater to protect regular women and girls.”

The orders from the Ministry of the Interior came on Aug. 18, 1945, one day before a Japanese delegation flew to the Philippines to negotiate the terms of their country’s surrender and occupation.

The Ibaraki police immediately set to work. The only suitable facility was a dormitory for single police officers, which they quickly converted into a brothel. Bedding from the navy was brought in, along with 20 comfort women. The brothel opened for business Sept. 20.

“As expected, after it opened it was elbow to elbow,” the history says. “The comfort women … had some resistance to selling themselves to men who just yesterday were the enemy, and because of differences in language and race, there were a great deal of apprehensions at first. But they were paid highly, and they gradually came to accept their work peacefully.”

Police officials and Tokyo businessmen established a network of brothels under the auspices of the Recreation and Amusement Association, which operated with government funds. On Aug. 28, 1945, an advance wave of occupation troops arrived in Atsugi, just south of Tokyo. By nightfall, the troops found the RAA’s first brothel.

“I rushed there with two or three RAA executives, and was surprised to see 500 or 600 soldiers standing in line on the street,” Seiichi Kaburagi, the chief of public relations for the RAA, wrote in a 1972 memoir. He said American MPs were barely able to keep the troops under control.

Though arranged and supervised by the police and civilian government, the system mirrored the comfort stations established by the Japanese military abroad during the war.

Kaburagi wrote that occupation GIs paid upfront and were given tickets and condoms. The first RAA brothel, called Komachien _ The Babe Garden _ had 38 women, but due to high demand that was quickly increased to 100. Each woman serviced from 15 to 60 clients a day.

American historian John Dower, in his book “Embracing Defeat: Japan in the Wake of WWII,” says the charge for a short session with a prostitute was 15 yen, or about a dollar, roughly the cost of half a pack of cigarettes.

Kaburagi said the sudden demand forced brothel operators to advertise for women who were not licensed prostitutes.

Natsue Takita, a 19-year-old Komachien worker whose relatives had been killed in the war, responded to an ad seeking an office worker. She was told the only positions available were for comfort women and was persuaded to accept the offer.

According to Kaburagi’s memoirs, published in Japanese after the occupation ended in 1952, Takita jumped in front of a train a few days after the brothel started operations.

“The worst victims … were the women who, with no previous experience, answered the ads calling for `Women of the New Japan,’” he wrote.

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By the end of 1945, about 350,000 U.S. troops were occupying Japan. At its peak, Kaburagi wrote, the RAA employed 70,000 prostitutes to serve them. Although there are suspicions, there is not clear evidence non-Japanese comfort women were imported to Japan as part of the program.

Toshiyuki Tanaka, a history professor at the Hiroshima Peace Institute, cautioned that Kaburagi’s number is hard to document. But he added the RAA was also only part of the picture _ the number of private brothels outside the official system was likely even higher.

The U.S. occupation leadership provided the Japanese government with penicillin for comfort women servicing occupation troops, established prophylactic stations near the RAA brothels and, initially, condoned the troops’ use of them, according to documents discovered by Tanaka.

Occupation leaders were not blind to the similarities between the comfort women procured by Japan for its own troops and those it recruited for the GIs.

A Dec. 6, 1945, memorandum from Lt. Col. Hugh McDonald, a senior officer with the Public Health and Welfare Division of the occupation’s General Headquarters, shows U.S. occupation forces were aware the Japanese comfort women were often coerced.

“The girl is impressed into contracting by the desperate financial straits of her parents and their urging, occasionally supplemented by her willingness to make such a sacrifice to help her family,” he wrote. “It is the belief of our informants, however, that in urban districts the practice of enslaving girls, while much less prevalent than in the past, still exists.”

Amid complaints from military chaplains and concerns that disclosure of the brothels would embarrass the occupation forces back in the U.S., on March 25, 1946, MacArthur placed all brothels, comfort stations and other places of prostitution off limits. The RAA soon collapsed.

MacArthur’s primary concern was not only a moral one.

By that time, Tanaka says, more than a quarter of all American GIs in the occupation forces had a sexually transmitted disease.

“The nationwide off-limits policy suddenly put more than 150,000 Japanese women out of a job,” Tanaka wrote in a 2002 book on sexual slavery. Most continued to serve the troops illegally. Many had VD and were destitute, he wrote.

Under intense pressure, Japan’s government apologized in 1993 for its role in running brothels around Asia and coercing women into serving its troops. The issue remains controversial today.

In January, California Rep. Mike Honda offered a resolution in the House condemning Japan’s use of sex slaves, in part to renew pressure on Japan ahead of the closure of the Asian Women’s Fund, a private foundation created two years after the apology to compensate comfort women.

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The fund compensated only 285 women in the Philippines, South Korea and Taiwan, out of an estimated 50,000-200,000 comfort women enslaved by Japan’s military in those countries during the war. Each received 2 million yen, about $17,800. A handful of Dutch and Indonesian women were also given assistance.

The fund closed, as scheduled, on March 31.

Haruki Wada, the fund’s executive director, said its creation marked an important change in attitude among Japan’s leadership and represented the will of Japan’s “silent majority” to see that justice is done. He also noted that although it was a private organization, the government was its main sponsor, kicking in 4.625 billion yen, about $40 million.

Even so, he admitted it fell short of expectations.

“The vast majority of the women did not come forward,” he said.

As a step toward acknowledging and resolving the exploitation of Japanese women, however, it was a complete failure.

Though they were free to do so, no Japanese women sought compensation.

“Not one Japanese woman has come forward to seek compensation or an apology,” Wada said. “Unless they feel they can say they were completely forced against their will, they feel they cannot come forward.”

And..

The U.S. military’s long, uncomfortable history with prostitution gets new attention
October 31, 2014

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/checkpoint/wp/2014/10/31/the-u-s-militarys-long-uncomfortable-history-with-prostitution-gets-new-attention/?utm_term=.ac73bcf2770a

A group of women in South Korea sued their own government in June, alleging that it trained them to serve as “patriots” or “civilian diplomats” in the 1960s and 1970s. Their real job: work as prostitutes near American military bases. The women were tested regularly to make sure they didn’t have sexually-transmitted diseases, and were locked up until they were healthy again if they did, they said.

It’s an uncomfortable part of the U.S. military’s long history with prostitution. The world’s oldest profession has long catered to U.S. troops, whether at home or abroad. But the issue is getting new scrutiny in South Korea, where the top U.S. commander, Gen. Curtis M. Scaparrotti, recently forbid all military personnel under his command from paying an employee in an “establishment” for his or her time.

The general said in a memorandum to his troops that not only is prostitution banned, but that service members are not allowed to pay a fee to play darts or billiards with a local employee or to buy them a drink or souvenir in exchange for their company.

“Service members are often encouraged to buy overpriced ‘juice’ drinks in exchange for the company of these women, or to pay a fee to obtain the company of an employee who is then relieved of their work shift (commonly referred to as “bar-fining” or “buying a day off”),” Scaparrotti said. “The governments of the Republic of Korea, the United States, and the Republic of the Philippines have linked these practices with prostitution and human trafficking.”

The effort comes as the Pentagon also attempts to crack down on another problem: sexual assault. Defense officials said in May that they recorded thousands of reports of sexual assault last year, and that the problem is much more widespread than commanders had realized.

Scaparrotti’s memo does not mention the push to stop sexual assault in the ranks, but it says he expects service members to respect “the dignity of others” at all times. Paying for companionship, he said, “encourages the objectification of women, reinforces sexist attitudes, and is demeaning to all human beings” — themes that have come up in the attempt to stop sexual assault, as well.

The general’s prohibition is part of a broader effort to crack down on “juicy bars” in South Korea. They’ve existed for years, with many of the women working in them said to be Filipino victims of human trafficking — modern-day sex slaves.

The connection between the U.S. military and prostitution goes far beyond that, however. In one high-profile example, several Navy officers and employees were charged last year with accepting prostitutes as part of a major bribery scandal. The women were furnished by the Malaysian tycoon, “Fat” Leonard Francis, in exchange for information that he allegedly used to defraud the U.S. government of millions of dollars, authorities said.

Francis, the CEO of Glenn Defense Marine Asia, a shipping firm that at one point had more than $200 million in contracts with the Navy, has denied the charges. Others already have pleaded guilty, including a retired Navy officer, an agent with the Naval Criminal Investigative Service and Francis’ cousin.

That case had connections to Malaysia, Singapore Japan and Indonesia, among other locations. But it involved much more money than the tawdry transactions that have been a part of military life for decades.

During Vietnam War, for example, prostitution was common. Infamously depicted in the 1987 movie “Full Metal Jacket,” it played a role in creating a generation of half-Americans in Vietnam who are now mostly in their 40s, according to a Global Post report in 2011.

In World War II, posters warned U.S. soldiers in Europe that “you can’t beat the Axis if you get VD.” Things may have been even worse in Japan, where American officials allowed an official brothel system for the use of U.S. troops until 1946, when Gen. Douglas MacArthur shut it down.

“Sadly, we police had to set up sexual comfort stations for the occupation troops,”an official history of one Japanese police department says, according to a 2007 Associated Press report. “The strategy was, through the special work of experienced women, to create a breakwater to protect regular women and girls.”

And,

‘My body was not mine, but the US military’s’
Inside the disturbing sex industry thriving around America’s bases.
11/3/15, 5:30 AM CET Updated 11/3/15, 2:54 PM CET

At night in the Songtan camptown outside Osan Air Base in South Korea, I wandered through streets that were getting louder and more crowded now that the sun had set. As the night progressed, hip-hop boomed out of bars along the main pedestrian mall and from second-floor clubs with neon-lit names like Club Woody’s, Pleasure World, Whisky a-Go-Go and the Hook Up Club. Many of the bars have stages with stripper poles for women to dance to the flash of stage lights and blasting music. In other bars, groups of mostly Filipina women in tight skirts and dresses talked to one another, leaning over the table as they shot pool. Some were chatting with a handful of GIs, young and old. Groups of younger GIs walked together through the red-light-district-meets-pedestrian-mall scene, peering into bars and considering their options. Bright signs for cheap hotels beckoned. Near a small food cart, a sign read, “man only massage prince hotel.”

For anyone in the U.S. military, it would have been a familiar sight. As long as armies have been fighting each other, and long before women were widely seen on the battlefield, female labor has been essential to the everyday operation of most militaries. But women haven’t just washed the laundry, cooked the food and nursed injured troops back to health. Women’s sex work has long been used to help keep male troops happy — or at least happy enough to keep working for the military. Today, commercial sex zones thrive in tandem with many U.S. bases around the world, from Baumholder in Germany to Fort Bragg in North Carolina. Many look much the same, filled with liquor stores, fast-food outlets, tattoo parlors, bars and clubs, and prostitution in one form or another.

The problems associated with the sex trade are particularly pronounced in South Korea, where “camptowns” that surround U.S. bases have become deeply entrenched in the country’s economy, politics and culture. Dating to the 1945 U.S. occupation of Korea, when GIs casually bought sex with as little as a cigarette, these camptowns have been at the center of an exploitative and profoundly disturbing sex industry—one that both displays and reinforces the military’s attitudes about men, women, power and dominance. In recent years, exposés and other investigations have shown just how openly prostitution has operated around American bases, leading the U.S. government to ban solicitation in the military and the South Korean government to crack down on the industry. But prostitution has far from disappeared. It has only grown more secretive and creative in its subterfuge. If you want to know more about what’s at the root of the military’s struggles with sexual abuse, look no further than Songtan.

(continues)

Finally,

South Korea Illegally Held Prostitutes Who Catered to G.I.s Decades Ago, Court Says
JAN. 20, 2017
South Korea — In a landmark ruling, a South Korean court said on Friday that the government had broken the law during the 1960s and ’70s by detaining prostitutes who catered to American soldiers, and by forcing them to undergo treatment for venereal diseases.

Dozens of former prostitutes brought a lawsuit to press the government to admit that it had played a hand in creating and managing a vast network of prostitution in camp towns, called gijichon, where poor Korean women worked in bars and brothels frequented by American troops.

In the ruling by a three-judge panel of the Central District Court in Seoul, the women did not win that admission or the apology they sought.

Yet the ruling was still a victory: For the first time, the court said the government had illegally detained gijichon prostitutes for forced treatment for sexually transmitted disease, and ordered it to pay 57 plaintiffs the equivalent of $4,240 each in compensation for physical and psychological damage.

Continue reading the main story
RELATED COVERAGE
Japan Recalls Ambassador to South Korea to Protest ‘Comfort Woman’ Statue JAN. 6, 2017

Opinion Editorial
No Closure on the ‘Comfort Women’ JAN. 6, 2017

Ex-Prostitutes Say South Korea and U.S. Enabled Sex Trade Near Bases JAN. 7, 2009
“This was a serious human rights violation that should never have happened and should never be repeated,” Judge Jeon Ji-won, speaking for the panel, said of the detention and forced treatment.

Judge Jeon said the prostitutes had been “comfort women for the United States military,” touching on one of the country’s most delicate historical issues by using the same euphemism for prostitutes the Japanese have applied to Korean and other women who were forced into sexual servitude by its soldiers during World War II.

The plaintiffs had encouraged that comparison, arguing that it was hypocritical for South Korea to condemn Japan for its historical wrongdoings while not acknowledging its own role in ensuring that foreign soldiers had access to Korean prostitutes.

“They say we walked into gijichon on our own, but we were cheated by job-placement agencies and were held in debt to pimps,” Park Young-ja, 62, one of the plaintiffs, said after the ruling on Friday. “I was only a teenager and I had to receive at least five G.I.s every day with no day off. When I ran away, they caught and beat me, raising my debt.”

She added, “There was no one speaking for us, and we were abandoned by the state.”

The Justice Ministry, which represented the government in the lawsuit, did not immediately react to the ruling on Friday.

In the destitute years after the Korean War of 1950-53, the dollars that prostitutes in the camp towns earned were a valued source of hard currency in South Korea. Former prostitutes have testified that government officials had urged them to earn more, calling them “patriots.”

At the same time, the women said, the health authorities cracked down on prostitutes who tested positive for sexually transmitted diseases, less out of concern for the women than to protect American soldiers. Newspaper accounts and parliamentary documents from the time referred to the prostitutes as “comfort women.” The court said on Friday that some of the women had been sold into the camps through human trafficking, while others appeared to have chosen prostitution to make a living.

Scholars who have studied the issue have said that the South Korean government was motivated in part by fear that the American military, stationed in the country to provide a defense against North Korea, would leave.

Morning Briefing: Asia and Australia
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The American military became involved in attempts to regulate the sex trade to minimize the spread of disease among soldiers, those scholars said. The United States military command in Seoul has said that it did not condone or support prostitution or human trafficking.

The South Korean government has never formally acknowledged involvement in the camp towns or taken responsibility for abuses there. The women kept quiet for decades, partly because the military governments that ruled South Korea until the late 1980s enforced silence about issues that could be seen as detrimental to the alliance with the United States.

In addition, South Korean society has an extremely negative view of prostitutes, especially ones who had been paid by foreign soldiers. Prostitution is and has always been illegal in South Korea.

In 2014, however, more than 120 former prostitutes filed a lawsuit demanding compensation and a government apology for their detention and forced treatment. Only 57 of the plaintiffs were awarded compensation on Friday, because the court said there was not enough evidence that the others had been detained illegally.

Kim Jin, a lawyer for the women, said the verdict on Friday was significant because it was the first official acknowledgment that women in the camp towns had been subjected to illegal treatment. But Ms. Kim said the women would appeal the ruling, seeking an official apology, greater compensation and a finding that the government was responsible for creating and running the camp towns.

“We are not doing this for a mere 5 million won,” a woman who declined to give her name shouted outside the courtroom, referring to the compensation in South Korean currency each woman would receive. “They told us to earn as many dollars as possible, and now they want us to keep our mouths shut.”

Shin Young-sook, an advocate for the women, welcomed the court’s use of the term “comfort women” to refer to the former prostitutes.

For decades, bars and brothels have lined the streets of neighborhoods around American bases in the country. But the former prostitutes involved in the lawsuit said that few of their fellow citizens knew how deeply their government had been involved in the sex trade in the camp towns in the past.

They say the government not only sponsored classes for them to learn basic English and etiquette, meant to help them sell themselves more effectively, but that the American military police and South Korean officials also regularly raided clubs looking for women who were thought to be spreading diseases.

They added that the police would then detain those women, locking them up in so-called monkey houses with barred windows. There, they said, the women were forced to take medications until they were well.

“They never sent us doctors even when we were so sick we almost died, except they treated us for venereal diseases,” Ms. Park said. “It’s clear that they treated our venereal diseases not for us but for the American soldiers.”

Now, the US and media outlets should apologize for being unfair, hypocrite to Japan.

Or, just like Japan has done for past decades, the US president should formally admit the sexual slavery by the US and apologize about atrocity the US committed, again and again and again.

Right? Because that is “being fair and justice”

At least, the US does not have the right to accuse anyone but herself.

—– READ the Related Posts —–

The US army records on “Comfort Women” found

CAN KOREA HANDLE THE TRUTH ABOUT JAPAN’S ‘COMFORT WOMEN’?

Comfort Women and North Korean abductions of Japanese citizens

Today’s “Comfort women” or prostitutes

Comfort women? sex slave?

“I’m Zapanese…”

A mistake of “The comfort women photo exhibition”

Diggin’ own grave: Rep. Mike Honda

Anti-Ignorance on Comfort Women

The U.S. “Sex Slave” resolution goin’ nowhere

Under The Sun – (“1984” like 2015 movie of North Korea)

I watched the movie “Under the sun” a few days ago.

Freaking scary. I’m scared of the fact that they teaches little kids hatred and brainwashing them. And they think this is something to be proud of?

North Korea and South Korea are no different in this regard… Education.

Both South Korea and North Korea can’t sustain their country unless they teach their nationals to hate others especially Japan. As if they are too afraid to love the free, democratic, developed country; Japan.

It is like, “If Koreans find out about Japan which is great and highly advanced and peaceful country, Koreans might again sell own country to Japan someday…”

South Korean society today

In South Korean society today, all the Koreans must hate Japan and get rid of “Japan remnant(일제잔재)”, otherwise you are a traitor to Koreans and they will shut you up. Because “Pro-Japan” Koreans “sold Korea to Japan in 1910”, “Pro-Japan” are traitors and anything good Japan has done is concealed.

They just can’t stand the fact that Korean independence from China(Sino) was GIVEN by Japan in 1895 , again the independence from Japan was GRANTED by the UN(the US) in 1945. They just want to deny the facts or show that those were not because of Korea’s inability.

South Korea today even DISREGARD her own Laws in order to undermine Japan. It’s out of control.

You can’t reason with those people.

They create fantasy of their own and drawing in it.

It’s pathetic, but sometimes, amusing.

474744574_9c177eccd2_o

que-14114915409

Wait, don’t blame them. They are just trying to be “good KOREAN citizens” in the “Japan-hate-is-a virtue” society just like North Koreans do.

Continue reading “South Korean society today”

The US army records on “Comfort Women”

Past a few years, new discoveries have been made.

Composite report on three Korean Navy civilians, list no. 78,

dated 28 Mar 45, re “Special question on Koreans”  (1945)

18. All Korean prostitutes that PoW have seen in the Pacific were volunteers or had been sold by their parents into prostitution. This is proper in the Korean way of thinking but direct conscription of women by the Japanese would be an outrage that the old and young alike would not tolerate. Men would rise up in a rage, killing Japanese no matter what consequence they might suffer.

Right. If, like Koreans today claim, Imperial Japanese government and army systematically kidnap and enslaved, raped and massacred the Korean women, WHAT A HELL WERE KOREAN MEN DOING AT  THE TIME?  Nothing?

Actually, recent discovery of Comfort Stations (Brothel) manager’s diary showed that it was Korean man who run the Brothel.

Diary of a Japanese Military Brothel Manager

Diary of a Japanese Military Brothel Manager is a book of diaries written by a clerk working in Japanese military brothels, also known as “comfort stations”, in Burma and Singapore during World War II. The author, a Korean businessman, kept a daily diary between 1922 and 1957. This diary was discovered by historian An Byeong-jik in 2012 and published in South Korea in 2013.

The Diary of a Japanese Military Brothel Manager is regarded as an important and credible contemporary document on the workings of Japan’s comfort women system. The diary sheds light on the extent to which the comfort women should be regarded as “sex slaves”, and the level of control which the Japanese military exercised over the military brothels.

 

And..

UNITED STATES
OFFICE OF WAR INFORMATION
Psychological Warfare Team
Attached to
U.S. Army Forces
India-Burma Theater
APO 689

Date Interrogated: Aug. 20 – Sept. 10, 1944

A “comfort girl” is nothing more than a prostitute or “professional camp follower” attached to the Japanese Army for the benefit of the soldiers. The word “comfort girl” is peculiar to the Japanese. Other reports show the “comfort girls” have been found wherever it was necessary for the Japanese Army to fight. This report however deals only with the Korean “comfort girls” recruited by the Japanese and attached to their Army in Burma.

 

 

comfort-women-wanted-advertisement

The picture above is a newspaper ad to recruit of Comfort Women in 1944 in Korea(Japan at the time).

And of course, there are always criminals. Like I posted here and here and here.

Five South Koreans convicted in US over sex-trafficking ring
Nov 9, 2007

NEW YORK (AFP) — Five South Koreans were found guilty in a New York court Friday of involvement in a sex-trafficking ring involving a string of brothels across the northeastern United States, officials said.

http://www.mywire.com/pubs/AFP/2007/11/09/4916822?extID=10051

.

Korean-American officer Admits He Helped Thwart a Brothel’s Rivals
Published: December 28, 2007

The former officer, Dennis Kim, 31, pleaded guilty in United States District Court in Brooklyn to a federal charge of conspiracy to commit extortion in his capacity as a police officer. The plea enables him to avoid a trial and the prospect of a lengthy jail sentence.

http://.www.nytimes.com/2007/12/28/nyregion/28plea.html?_r=2&oref=slogin&oref=slogin

Arrest made in spa-sex case
Wednesday, May 21, 2008

Federal authorities say they have busted the leader of a national prostitution ring – a 50-year-old Cheviot woman.

Yong Williams admitted to undercover agents that she drove 40,000 miles in seven months, delivering Korean women to massage parlors across the nation that were fronts for brothels, according to federal court records.

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080521/NEWS0103/805210377

2008-05-22
The court has also made several notable prosecutions of human traffickers. In 2006, 40 people were indicted on charges of running brothels staffed by more than 70 Korean sex slaves. Investigators said the suspects smuggled the Korean women through Canada and Mexico. “You have organized crime syndicates compromising border security, bringing people in, putting them in terrible danger, and then trafficking them in the United States. A terrible problem and a very, very difficult problem to get at,” he said.

http://voanews.com/english/2008-05-22-voa35.cfm?renderforprint=1&textonly=1&&TEXTMODE=1&CFI

Just like that.

Imperial Japan’s Police arrested illegal Korean dealers who kidnapped and sold women into brothels.

asahi

〈田舎娘など十四名も誘拐 一味送局さる
『大阪朝日・西鮮版』1940年6月28日

京城府蓬莱町四丁目無職裴長彦(五十七年)ほか十一名は共謀して田舎の生活苦に喘ぐ家庭の娘、あるひは出戻り女など十四名を誘拐して酌婦あるひは娼妓などに売飛ばして約一万余円をせしめてゐた事件は西大門署で取調べてゐたが、二十五日一件書類とともに送局した〉

The picture above is a little news report saying “Korean who kidnapped and sold women into brothels has arrested.” in 1940.

You can find some more on these.

Comfort Women Articles by Scholars
http://scholarsinenglish.blogspot.jp/2014/10/korean-newspaper-articles-from-1930s.html

And, finally, I have to point out that there were the US army’s Comfort Stations in Korea after WWII.

Prostitutes in South Korea for the U.S. military

Prostitutes servicing members of the U.S. military in South Korea have been known locally under a variety of terms. Yankee princess (Hangul: 양공주 [3][4][5]—also translated as Western princess) is a common name and literal meaning for the prostitutes in the Gijichon, U.S. military Camp Towns[2][6][7]) in South Korea.[8][9][10] Yankee whore (Hangul: 양갈보 Yanggalbo)[3] and Western whore are also a common name. The women are also referred to as U.N. madams (Hangul: 유엔마담 ,[11][12] U.N. madam).[13] Juicy girls is a common name for Filipina prostitutes.[14] The term “Western princess” has been commonly used in the press, such as The Dong-a Ilbo for decades.[8][15] On the other hand, it is also used as an insulting epithet.[16]

Until the early 1990s, the term Wianbu (Hangul: 위안부 , “Comfort Women”) was often used by South Korean media and officials to refer to prostitutes for the U.S. military,[17][18] but comfort women was also the euphemism used for the sex slaves for the Imperial Japanese Army,[19][20][21] and in order to avoid confusions, the term yanggongju replaced wianbu to refer to sexual laborers for the U.S. military.[2][22][23] The early 1990s also saw the two women’s rights movements diverge: on one side the one representing the Cheongsindae (Comfort women for the Japanese military), and on the other side the movement representing the Gijichon (Camptown for the US military), even if some women happen to have been victims of forced labor on both sides.[24] Now some South Korean media use the term migun wianbu (미군 위안부, 美軍慰安婦 “US military comfort women”),[25][26] literally American Comfort Women.

Wait. Why it is titled “Prostitutes in South Korea for the U.S. military”?  If you call Imperial Japanese uses Comfort Women, you call it “Sex Slaves”, but when the US army uses Comfort Women, it is “prostitution”. What a double standard.

And those “Prostitutes” sued Korean Goverment in 2014.

 

South Korea: Suit Against Government for Forced Prostitution after 1957
The Library of Congress

(July 9, 2014) On June 25, 2014, 122 women sued the Korean government, claiming that they were forced to engage in sexual intercourse for money for members of the United States military who were stationed in Korea after the Korean War cease-fire in 1957. (Toru Higashioka, Former “Comfort Women” Serving U.S. Military File Damages Lawsuit, ASAHI SHINBUN (June 28, 2014).)

The involvement of the Korean government in the prostitution around U.S. military bases only slowly became public knowledge. (KATHARINE H.S. MOON, SEX AMONG ALLIES (1997); Sang-hun Choe, Ex-Prostitutes Say South Korea and U.S. Enabled Sex Trade Near Bases, NY TIMES (Jan. 7, 2009).) In 2012, the Gender Equality and Family Committee of the National Assembly asked the Ministry of Gender Equality & Family to investigate the issue and establish a policy. However, the Ministry did not send the result of the investigation to the Committee. Because the government did not do anything to further the investigation, the plaintiffs and their support groups decided to file the lawsuit. (“Camp Town Women Control” Disclosure of Document Signed by Park Chung-hee [in Korean], HANKYOREH (Nov. 6, 2013).)

Some evidence of the government’s involvement was found recently. In 2013, National Assembly member Sung-hui Yu submitted to the Committee a document, “Camp Town Clean-up Measures,” that was created by the administrative affairs department of the President’s Office in April 1957 and signed by the former President, Park Chung-hee, on May 2, 1957. The document stated that 9,935 women lived in 62 camp towns (villages around U.S. military bases). The document proposed measures to work toward:

eradication of sexually transmitted diseases;
improvement of conditions in the villages;
provision of clean water; and
other steps. (Id.)
At a press conference about the lawsuit, members of support groups stated that some of the 122 women went to the camp towns because they were poor and could not make a living otherwise after the war. Some of them were sent there through human trafficking. They were forced by violent means to sell their bodies to American soldiers. The government exploited them in order to earn U.S. dollars. The plaintiffs are seeking an apology from the government and approximately US$10,000 each in damages. The supporters explained that the amount was decided somewhat randomly, because it was necessary to specify an amount for the litigation. (“Camp Town Women’s” Group Files Lawsuits for Damages Against the Government [in Korean], YONHAP NEWS (June 25, 2014).)

 

Did the US president apologized and pay? No.

 

Former Korean ‘comfort women’ for U.S. troops sue own government – reuters
Fri Jul 11, 2014 | 6:45am EDT

Cho Myung-ja ran away from home as a teenager to escape a father who beat her, finding her way to the red light district in a South Korean town that hosts a large U.S. Army garrison.

After she escaped home in the early 1960s, her pimp sold her to one of the brothels allowed by the government to serve American soldiers.

“It was a hard life and we got sick,” Cho, 76, said in an interview in her cluttered room in a shack outside Camp Humphreys, a busy U.S. military garrison in the town of Pyeongtaek, south of Seoul.

On June 25, sixty-four years after the Korean War broke out, Cho joined 122 surviving comfort women, as they were called, in a lawsuit against their government to reclaim, they say, human dignity and proper compensation.

The suit comes as an embarrassing distraction for the South Korean government, which has pushed Japan to properly atone for what it says were World War Two atrocities including forcing women, many of them Korean, to serve as sex slaves for its soldiers.

The women claim the South Korean government trained them and worked with pimps to run a sex trade through the 1960s and 1970s for U.S. troops, encouraged women to work as prostitutes and violated their human rights.

The suit was lodged with the Seoul Central District Court and Reuters has seen the document laying out the accusations against the government and a demand for 10 million won ($9,800) in compensation per plaintiff.

The Ministry of Gender Equality and Family declined to comment on the lawsuit. The U.S. military in South Korea said it was aware of reports of the lawsuit.

“USFK has a zero tolerance for prostitution and human trafficking,” a U.S. Forces in Korea spokesman said in response to a request for comment. “Prostitution and human trafficking are cruel, demeaning and incompatible with our military core values.”

“CIVILIAN DIPLOMATS”

The South Korean government was desperate to keep U.S. troops in the 1960s after a devastating but inconclusive war with North Korea and wanted the women to serve as “patriots” and “civilian diplomats”.

The virtuous-sounding titles did little to reflect the life they led. They say they were forced by the South Korean government to undergo degrading checkups for sexually transmitted diseases and if the test was positive, locked up until they were “fit” to work.

“To make sure we didn’t pass on some disease to foreigners, we were tested twice a week, and if it looked abnormal, we would be locked up on the fourth floor, unlocking the door only at meal times, and some people broke their legs trying to escape,” Cho said amid the frequent hum of military aircraft.

Afterwards, they say they were neglected and forgotten, left to live out their lives in poverty, stigmatized for having worked as prostitutes.

The lawsuit is a culmination of work by a handful of small and regional NGOs that came together in 2008 to gather their testimonies and seek legal advice.

This week, an opposition member of parliament led a group of 10 liberal lawmakers to introduce a bill calling for a probe into the program, formal recognition for the contribution made by the women and financial compensation.

Hundreds of former prostitutes continue to live clustered around military bases in South Korea, many of them ill and poor, without family and financially unable to move.

Working through the 1960s and 1970s, the women say they were treated as commodities used to boost a post-war economy.
“They say we were patriots at the time, but now they couldn’t care less,” said another former prostitute, Kim Sook-ja, 70. “We didn’t fight with guns or bayonets but we worked for the country and earned dollars.”

($1 = 1,020 won)

 

Claims South Korea Provided Sex Slaves for U.S. Troops Go to Court – The Wall Street Journal.

 

 

Now, it is the US turn to admit and apologize to Japan for falsely accusing!

 

The US army even used Japanese Comfort Stations in Japan.

What a hypocrite.

GIs Frequented Japan’s ‘Comfort Women’

The Associated Press
Wednesday, April 25, 2007; 9:45 PM
TOKYO — Japan’s abhorrent practice of enslaving women to provide sex for its troops in World War II has a little-known sequel: After its surrender _ with tacit approval from the U.S. occupation authorities _ Japan set up a similar “comfort women” system for American GIs.

An Associated Press review of historical documents and records _ some never before translated into English _ shows American authorities permitted the official brothel system to operate despite internal reports that women were being coerced into prostitution. The Americans also had full knowledge by then of Japan’s atrocious treatment of women in countries across Asia that it conquered during the war.

Tens of thousands of women were employed to provide cheap sex to U.S. troops until the spring of 1946, when Gen. Douglas MacArthur shut the brothels down.
The documents show the brothels were rushed into operation as American forces poured into Japan beginning in August 1945.

“Sadly, we police had to set up sexual comfort stations for the occupation troops,” recounts the official history of the Ibaraki Prefectural Police Department, whose jurisdiction is just northeast of Tokyo. “The strategy was, through the special work of experienced women, to create a breakwater to protect regular women and girls.”

The orders from the Ministry of the Interior came on Aug. 18, 1945, one day before a Japanese delegation flew to the Philippines to negotiate the terms of their country’s surrender and occupation.

The Ibaraki police immediately set to work. The only suitable facility was a dormitory for single police officers, which they quickly converted into a brothel. Bedding from the navy was brought in, along with 20 comfort women. The brothel opened for business Sept. 20.

“As expected, after it opened it was elbow to elbow,” the history says. “The comfort women … had some resistance to selling themselves to men who just yesterday were the enemy, and because of differences in language and race, there were a great deal of apprehensions at first. But they were paid highly, and they gradually came to accept their work peacefully.”

Police officials and Tokyo businessmen established a network of brothels under the auspices of the Recreation and Amusement Association, which operated with government funds. On Aug. 28, 1945, an advance wave of occupation troops arrived in Atsugi, just south of Tokyo. By nightfall, the troops found the RAA’s first brothel.

“I rushed there with two or three RAA executives, and was surprised to see 500 or 600 soldiers standing in line on the street,” Seiichi Kaburagi, the chief of public relations for the RAA, wrote in a 1972 memoir. He said American MPs were barely able to keep the troops under control.

Though arranged and supervised by the police and civilian government, the system mirrored the comfort stations established by the Japanese military abroad during the war.

Kaburagi wrote that occupation GIs paid upfront and were given tickets and condoms. The first RAA brothel, called Komachien _ The Babe Garden _ had 38 women, but due to high demand that was quickly increased to 100. Each woman serviced from 15 to 60 clients a day.

American historian John Dower, in his book “Embracing Defeat: Japan in the Wake of WWII,” says the charge for a short session with a prostitute was 15 yen, or about a dollar, roughly the cost of half a pack of cigarettes.

Kaburagi said the sudden demand forced brothel operators to advertise for women who were not licensed prostitutes.

Natsue Takita, a 19-year-old Komachien worker whose relatives had been killed in the war, responded to an ad seeking an office worker. She was told the only positions available were for comfort women and was persuaded to accept the offer.

According to Kaburagi’s memoirs, published in Japanese after the occupation ended in 1952, Takita jumped in front of a train a few days after the brothel started operations.

“The worst victims … were the women who, with no previous experience, answered the ads calling for `Women of the New Japan,'” he wrote.

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By the end of 1945, about 350,000 U.S. troops were occupying Japan. At its peak, Kaburagi wrote, the RAA employed 70,000 prostitutes to serve them. Although there are suspicions, there is not clear evidence non-Japanese comfort women were imported to Japan as part of the program.

Toshiyuki Tanaka, a history professor at the Hiroshima Peace Institute, cautioned that Kaburagi’s number is hard to document. But he added the RAA was also only part of the picture _ the number of private brothels outside the official system was likely even higher.

The U.S. occupation leadership provided the Japanese government with penicillin for comfort women servicing occupation troops, established prophylactic stations near the RAA brothels and, initially, condoned the troops’ use of them, according to documents discovered by Tanaka.

Occupation leaders were not blind to the similarities between the comfort women procured by Japan for its own troops and those it recruited for the GIs.

A Dec. 6, 1945, memorandum from Lt. Col. Hugh McDonald, a senior officer with the Public Health and Welfare Division of the occupation’s General Headquarters, shows U.S. occupation forces were aware the Japanese comfort women were often coerced.

“The girl is impressed into contracting by the desperate financial straits of her parents and their urging, occasionally supplemented by her willingness to make such a sacrifice to help her family,” he wrote. “It is the belief of our informants, however, that in urban districts the practice of enslaving girls, while much less prevalent than in the past, still exists.”

Amid complaints from military chaplains and concerns that disclosure of the brothels would embarrass the occupation forces back in the U.S., on March 25, 1946, MacArthur placed all brothels, comfort stations and other places of prostitution off limits. The RAA soon collapsed.

MacArthur’s primary concern was not only a moral one.

By that time, Tanaka says, more than a quarter of all American GIs in the occupation forces had a sexually transmitted disease.

“The nationwide off-limits policy suddenly put more than 150,000 Japanese women out of a job,” Tanaka wrote in a 2002 book on sexual slavery. Most continued to serve the troops illegally. Many had VD and were destitute, he wrote.

Under intense pressure, Japan’s government apologized in 1993 for its role in running brothels around Asia and coercing women into serving its troops. The issue remains controversial today.

In January, California Rep. Mike Honda offered a resolution in the House condemning Japan’s use of sex slaves, in part to renew pressure on Japan ahead of the closure of the Asian Women’s Fund, a private foundation created two years after the apology to compensate comfort women.

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The fund compensated only 285 women in the Philippines, South Korea and Taiwan, out of an estimated 50,000-200,000 comfort women enslaved by Japan’s military in those countries during the war. Each received 2 million yen, about $17,800. A handful of Dutch and Indonesian women were also given assistance.

The fund closed, as scheduled, on March 31.

Haruki Wada, the fund’s executive director, said its creation marked an important change in attitude among Japan’s leadership and represented the will of Japan’s “silent majority” to see that justice is done. He also noted that although it was a private organization, the government was its main sponsor, kicking in 4.625 billion yen, about $40 million.

Even so, he admitted it fell short of expectations.

“The vast majority of the women did not come forward,” he said.

As a step toward acknowledging and resolving the exploitation of Japanese women, however, it was a complete failure.

Though they were free to do so, no Japanese women sought compensation.

“Not one Japanese woman has come forward to seek compensation or an apology,” Wada said. “Unless they feel they can say they were completely forced against their will, they feel they cannot come forward.”

___

Oh, by the way, there is a French ones too.

Bordel militaire de campagne
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A BMC in Morocco in the 1920s
Bordels Mobiles de Campagne or Bordel Militaire de Campagne (both abbreviated to BMC) is a French term for the mobile brothels which were used during World War I, Second World War, and First Indochina War to supply prostitution services to French soldiers who were facing combat in areas where brothels were unusual, such as at the front line or in isolated garrisons.[1][2] In France, brothels were outlawed in 1946 by the “loi Marthe Richard”. In the French Foreign Legion (Légion Etrangère), they were in use until the late 1990s, when a scandal revealed that a staff of three was officially employed by a military unit of 100 men in Africa.[citation needed]

The last operational B.M.C. in territorial France, was operated by the 2nd. Regiment of the Foreign Legion in the town of Calvi, Corsica; it was closed in 1978.[citation needed] The last BMC to close in France’s overseas territories was the one operated Kourou, closed in 1995.[citation needed] Until 2003, a BMC was in operation in a military base of the Foreign Legion in Djibouti.[citation needed]

These mobile brothels were in some cases officially organized by the army. They consisted of large trailer trucks in which up to ten women would work.[3] The first references to these BMC’s were in World War I, and they are noted particularly in the Indochina War and the Algerian War. In the Indochina War, the French used women from the Ouled Naïl tribe of the highlands of Algeria.[4] BMC’s were known to have a significant role in the spread of sexually transmitted diseases[3] and were an avenue of attack by female Viet Minh sympathizers.[5] There was a vast BMC in Saigon known as “the park of the buffaloes”, and in January 1954, a BMC containing Vietnamese and Algerian prostitutes[6] was flown to Dien Bien Phu.[2] Here, the prostitutes became nursing assistants for the French garrison during the siege, though they were sent for reeducation by the Viet Minh after the French garrison fell.[6]

and

France’s military brothels: Hidden history of the First World War – http://www.france24.com/

 

 

 

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Comfort women? sex slave?

“I’m Zapanese…”

A mistake of “The comfort women photo exhibition”

Diggin’ own grave: Rep. Mike Honda

Anti-Ignorance on Comfort Women

The U.S. “Sex Slave” resolution goin’ nowhere

CAN KOREA HANDLE THE TRUTH ABOUT JAPAN’S ‘COMFORT WOMEN’?

10 years have passed since I started this blog. And some people began to realize something is wrong with South Korean claims.

I told you so in 10 freaking years ago.

CAN KOREA HANDLE THE TRUTH ABOUT JAPAN’S ‘COMFORT WOMEN’?
South China Morning Post

15 JAN 2017

With its recall of two diplomats this week, Japan appears to have upped the ante in its long-running dispute with Korea over its use of wartime sex slaves, reigniting enmities over an issue that had until recently seemed tantalisingly close to a conclusion.

And standing in the way of what might have been a watershed moment in diplomatic relations between the two countries? The statue of a teenage girl.

Rewind just a year and it appeared Seoul and Tokyo had reached a measure of closure over wartime Japan’s use of what were euphemistically known as “comfort women” – the reportedly hundreds of thousands of women, mainly from Korea, recruited to serve in its military-run brothels during the second world war.
But any lingering such notions were dispelled when Nagamine Yasumasa, the ambassador to South Korea, and Morimoto Yasuhiro, the consul general in Busan, returned to Japan on January 9.

That move, prompted by Tokyo’s displeasure over statues symbolising “comfort women” in front of the Japanese embassy in Seoul and consulate in Busan, was the first high-level diplomatic recall by Japan since August 2012, when South Korea’s then president, Lee Myung-bak, visited the disputed islets of Dokdo (known as Takeshima in Japan).

Yet chances of the two countries putting the issue behind them had once, albeit briefly, seemed so promising. On December 28, 2015, Japanese Foreign Minister Kishida Fumio and South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se struck a landmark deal in which Tokyo agreed to pay 1 billion yen (HK$67 million) to the surviving victims and issue a formal apology.

For its part, South Korea agreed to consider the matter resolved and to speak with relevant organisations about the removal of the comfort woman statue in front of the embassy. So when Japan paid the 1 billion yen and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe apologised, hopes of closure on the issue – and a new era for Japanese-Korean relations – did not seem so far-fetched.

South Korean self-immolates over ‘comfort women’ deal with Japan, as PM Abe urges Seoul to remove new statue

Except Korea then decided that Abe’s apology did not go far enough and therefore the matter was not resolved. Not only does the statue in front of the Seoul embassy remain standing, it now has a sister. In December 2016 – one year after that “landmark deal” – a replica of the statue was installed outside the Japanese consulate in Busan. That statue was briefly confiscated by police, as the group that installed it had done so without a permit, but it returned after a flood of protests from the public.

Tokyo asked for both statues to be removed, but Seoul replied that it had spoken to the civic groups involved and had no further responsibility. This led Tokyo to recall the diplomats and Woo Sang-ho, floor leader of the Minjoo Party of Korea, to suggest that, rather than remove the statues, Korea should return the 1 billion yen.

Since then, public opinion on each side of the debate has hardened, and what had seemed like a watershed moment now appears more like a stalemate.

The United States seems to have backed Seoul in the deadlock, with Secretary of State John Kerry on Thursday commending Korea for faithfully implementing its side of the 2015 agreement.
Yet it may be that much of the blame for the deadlock lies not with the former aggressor, Japan, but with its victim.

“Give me the liberty to know, to utter, and to argue freely,” the English poet John Milton said in his polemic Areopagitica, which begins by paying respect to England for overcoming the tyranny of Charles I.

Similarly, any criticism of Korea should begin with an acknowledgement of the admirable distance it has travelled from the stupid and corrupt leadership of the Joseon era, the maniacal raping and pillaging of Japanese colonialists and the bloodthirsty dictatorships of its early democracy. Korea has come a long way and deserves a great measure of respect as a free and open society, but as Milton puts it, the freedom to speak must be paired with the freedom to know.

For this reason, it is perhaps telling that in this debate, one party refuses to entertain dissenting views, while the other at least consents to look at all the evidence.

While Japan considers other views – modern awareness of the “comfort women” issue began with the Japanese writer Senda Kakou – the Korean government is hostile to any voices that depart from its narrative. This should be a red flag.

Reconciliation cannot wait for the ‘comfort women’ victims of wartime Japan

Park Yu-ha, a professor of Japanese literature at Seoul’s Sejong University, published a book in 2013 titled Comfort Women of Empire, in which she detailed a nuanced history that included not only sex slaves, but prostitutes. She criticised Japanese right-wing extremists, argued that Japan should take responsibility for its actions, explained how its past attempts to do so had failed and described the role Korean collaborators played in trafficking Korean women for financial gain. In February 2015, the Korean government ordered her to redact 34 passages. In January 2016, a Korean court ordered her to pay 10 million won (HK$65,000) each to nine former comfort women for defamation.

This should be weighed alongside the scandal regarding Korea’s state-authored textbooks that depict the dictator Park Chung-hee in a favourable light. One might reply to this that Japan, too, has its own textbook scandal, involving books that depict its wartime atrocities in a favourable light, but those textbooks were created by a private right-wing group and were only ever used by 0.02 per cent of Japanese middle schools.

If anything, the textbooks are evidence of Japan’s freedom of speech – as are the schools in Japan that openly teach North Korean propaganda, something that would be illegal in South Korea. Officially, this illegality is because the South is still technically at war with the North, but there are plenty of other examples of Korean censorship. The country banned Japanese manga until 1998, restricted Japanese music until 1999 and restricted Japanese film until 2004. In 2014, the Korean song Uh-ee by the K-pop group Crayon Pop, was banned because it contained a Japanese word, pikapika (sparkling).

Restrictions on free speech – of which Korea seems fond – tend to injure and blur the truth.

Given this, it’s worth returning to the issue of “comfort women” to consider what ought to be a basic, objective, fact – the number of Korean victims involved.

South Korean ‘comfort women’ continue to fight sex slavery accord with Japan

The Korea Herald has repeatedly cited “up to 200,000 women, mostly from Korea”, and this is in line with other Korean sources. But this number deserves more attention than it tends to get.

In The Comfort Women: Sexual Violence and Postcolonial Memory in Korea and Japan, Chunghee Sarah Soh, a professor of anthropology at San Francisco State University who specialises in issues related to gender and sexuality, says the widely cited figure of 200,000 comes from a 1981 essay in the Hanguk Ilbo by Yun Cheong-ok, a professor of English literature who claims that of 200,000 “volunteers” only 50,000 to 70,000 were sent to the front lines to become comfort women.

Yun “did not reveal the source of the figures given in her essay”, Soh says. She tells us a writer named Kim Teok-seong used the same figures a decade earlier in an article in Seoul Sinmun, and provides an excerpt.

South Korean former ‘comfort women’ Gil Won-ok and Kim Bok-dong, who were forced into sexual slavery for Japanese soldiers during the second world war, attend a weekly anti-Japanese demonstration in front of the Japanese embassy in Seoul. Photo: AFP
South Korean former ‘comfort women’ Gil Won-ok and Kim Bok-dong, who were forced into sexual slavery for Japanese soldiers during the second world war, attend a weekly anti-Japanese demonstration in front of the Japanese embassy in Seoul. Photo: AFP

“From 1943 to 1945 approximately 200,000 Korean and Japanese women were mobilised as cheongsindae [comfort women for the Japanese military],” Kim wrote. “The estimated number of Koreans among them is between fifty and seventy thousand.”

In other words, according to these sources, not all 200,000 were used as comfort women, and even of those that were, not all were Korean. On the other hand, Kim makes no mention of recruits prior to 1943, when most comfort women survivors say they were recruited.

Learn from the past to build a better world, ‘comfort women’ historian urges young Chinese

One way or the other – whether too high or low – the often-cited 200,000 figure is highly questionable.

Yet any such suggestion would be shouted down in Korea, or never even heard, creating an echo chamber of opinion. This does an injustice not only to truth and Korean democracy, but to the victims, as well.

As the diplomatic battle with Tokyo continues, Seoul’s best weapon isn’t the outrage of the public, but a forum in which all ideas can be heard and openly defeated, or accepted.

“There can be no denial of the tragic victimisation of forcibly recruited women,” Soh concludes, adding that “it was Japan’s colonialism that undoubtedly facilitated the large-scale victimisation of tens of thousands of Korean women”.

And the “Park Yu-ha”‘s case.

Disputing Korean Narrative on ‘Comfort Women,’ a Professor Draws Fierce Backlash
DEC. 18, 2015
New York Times

South Korea — WHEN she published her book about Korean “comfort women” in 2013, Park Yu-ha wrote that she felt “a bit fearful” of how it might be received.

After all, she said, it challenged “the common knowledge” about the wartime sex slaves.

But even she was not prepared for the severity of the backlash.

In February, a South Korean court ordered Ms. Park’s book, “Comfort Women of the Empire,” redacted in 34 sections where it found her guilty of defaming former comfort women with false facts. Ms. Park is also on trial on the criminal charge of defaming the aging women, widely accepted here as an inviolable symbol of Korea’s suffering under colonial rule by Japan and its need for historical justice, and she is being sued for defamation by some of the women themselves.

The women have called for Ms. Park’s expulsion from Sejong University in Seoul, where she is a professor of Japanese literature. Other researchers say she is an apologist for Japan’s war crimes. On social media, she has been vilified as a “pro-Japanese traitor.”

“They do not want you to see other aspects of the comfort women,” the soft-spoken Ms. Park said during a recent interview at a quiet street-corner cafe run by one of her supporters. “If you do, they think you are diluting the issue, giving Japan indulgence.”

The issue of the comfort women has long been controversial, and it is difficult to determine if the version of events put forward by Ms. Park — who critics say is nothing more than a mouthpiece for Japan — is any more correct than many others that have been offered over the years. Yet, for decades, the common knowledge Ms. Park is challenging has remained as firm among Koreans as their animosity toward their island neighbor.

In the early 20th century, the official history holds, Japan forcibly took innocent girls from Korea and elsewhere to its military-run brothels. There, they were held as sex slaves and defiled by dozens of soldiers a day in the most hateful legacy of Japan’s 35-year colonial rule, which ended with its defeat in World War II.

AS she researched her book, combing through a rich archive in South Korea and Japan and interviewing surviving comfort women, Ms. Park, 58, said she came to realize that such a sanitized, uniform image of Korean comfort women did not fully explain who they were and only deepened this most emotional of the many disputes between South Korea and Japan.

In trying to give what she calls a more comprehensive view of the women’s lives, she made claims that some found refreshing but many considered outrageous and, in some cases, traitorous.

In her book, she emphasized that it was profiteering Korean collaborators, as well as private Japanese recruiters, who forced or lured women into the “comfort stations,” where life included both rape and prostitution. There is no evidence, she wrote, that the Japanese government was officially involved in, and therefore legally responsible for, coercing Korean women.

Although often brutalized in a “slavelike condition” in their brothels, Ms. Park added, the women from the Japanese colonies of Korea and Taiwan were also treated as citizens of the empire and were expected to consider their service patriotic. They forged a “comradelike relationship” with the Japanese soldiers and sometimes fell in love with them, she wrote. She cited cases where Japanese soldiers took loving care of sick women and even returned those who did not want to become prostitutes.

The book sold only a few thousand copies. But it set off an outsize controversy.

Her case shows how difficult it has become in South Korea to challenge the conventional wisdom about comfort women,” said Kim Gyu-hang, a social critic.

Ms. Park’s book, published in Japan last year, won awards there. Last month, 54 intellectuals from Japan and the United States issued a statement criticizing South Korean prosecutors for “suppressing the freedom of scholarship and press.” Among them was a former chief cabinet secretary in Japan, Yohei Kono, who issued a landmark apology in 1993 admitting coercion in the recruitment of comfort women.
Japan’s Apologies for World War II
Even then, however, Mr. Kono noted that the recruiting had been conducted mainly by private agents working at the request of the Japanese military, and by administrative and military personnel. For outraged South Koreans, the caveats rendered the apology useless.

This month, 190 South Korean scholars and cultural figures issued a statement supporting what Ms. Park had tried to do in her book, if not everything written in it. They called her indictment an “anachronistic” attempt to “keep public opinion on comfort women under state control.”

But others said the talk of academic freedom missed the main point of the backlash. This month, 380 scholars and activists from South Korea, Japan and elsewhere accused Ms. Park of “exposing a serious neglect of legal understanding” and avoiding the “essence” of the issue: Japan’s state responsibility.

PRIVACY POLICY
Their statement maintained that state agencies of Japan, like its military, were involved in the “hideous crime” of coercing tens of thousands of women into sexual slavery, a view shared by two United Nations special rapporteurs in the 1990s.

Yang Hyun-ah, a professor at the Seoul National University School of Law, said that Ms. Park’s most egregious mistake was to “generalize selectively chosen details from the women’s lives.”

“I wish her expelled from the country,” said Yoo Hee-nam, 87, one of the nine former comfort women who sued Ms. Park, shaking her walking stick during a news conference.

MS. PARK, who is divorced with a son, grew up in South Korea and graduated from high school there before moving to Japan with her family. She attended college in Japan and earned a Ph.D. in Japanese literature from Waseda University. She touched on the subject of the comfort women in an earlier book, “For Reconciliation,” which reflected her broader interest in healing the tortured relations between the two countries.

She began writing her latest book in 2011 to help narrow the gulf between deniers in Japan who dismissed comfort women as prostitutes and their image in South Korea. That gap appears to have broadened under President Park Geun-hye of South Korea and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan, who have been accused of trying to impose their governments’ historical views on their people.

Last year, Mr. Abe’s political allies went so far as to advocate a reconsideration of Mr. Kono’s 1993 apology.

Ms. Park said she had tried to broaden discussions by investigating the roles that patriarchal societies, statism and poverty played in the recruitment of comfort women. She said that unlike women rounded up as spoils of battle in conquered territories like China, those from the Korean colony had been taken to the comfort stations in much the same way poor women today enter prostitution.

She also compared the Korean comfort women to more recent Korean prostitutes who followed American soldiers into their winter field exercises in South Korea in the 1960s through ’80s. (The “blanket corps,” so called because the women often carried blankets under their arms, followed pimps searching for American troops through snowy hills or built field brothels with tents as the Americans lined up outside, according to former prostitutes for the United States military.)

“Korean comfort women were victims, but they were also collaborators as people from a colony,” Ms. Park wrote in one of the redacted sentences in her book.

But she added that even if the Japanese government did not directly order the women’s forced recruitment and some Korean women joined comfort stations voluntarily, the government should still be held responsible for the “sin” of creating the colonial structure that allowed it to happen.

Ms. Park said she had no reason to defame comfort women.

After Korea’s liberation in 1945, she said, former comfort women erased much of their memories, like their hatred of “their own parents and Korean recruiters who sold them.” Instead, she wrote, they were expected to serve only as a “symbol of a victimized nation,” a role foisted on them by nationalist activists to incite anti-Japanese feelings and accepted by South Koreans in general.

“Whether the women volunteered or not, whether they did prostitution or not, our society needed them to remain pure, innocent girls,” she said in the interview. “If not, people think they cannot hold Japan responsible.”

You can find a good summary of her book here.

Did S. Korea operate “comfort stations” in the Vietnam War?

Apr.25,2015 13:12 KST

Recent Japanese magazine report accuses South Korea of being a perpetrator on the comfort women issue
“That Turkish bath was a ‘welfare center’ set up by the South Korean military exclusively for South Korean troops.”
Did South Korea run prostitution facilities similar to the Japanese military’s “comfort stations” in Saigon and other cities during the Vietnam War? This question is drawing new attention after a Japanese magazine report on the discovery of records suggesting so by the US National Archives and Records Administration (NARA).
At one level, the report comes across strongly as an attempt to draw attention away from Japan after South Korea’s persistent efforts to demand action from Tokyo to resolve the issue of “comfort women” forcibly mobilized as sexual slaves to the Japanese military. But the issue warrants investigation by the South Korean government – and if the allegations prove true, a serious effort should be launched to resolve the matter.

“Spring special” edition on Apr. 2 by the Shukan Bunshun weekly newsmagazine
The report in question was printed in an extra-large “spring special” edition on Apr. 2 by the Shukan Bunshun weekly newsmagazine, one of the leading forces in promoting anti-Korean sentiment in Japan. The article was written by Noriyuki Yamaguchi, chief of the Washington bureau of the Tokyo Broadcasting System (TBS). Yamaguchi explained that he wrote the piece after hearing advice from an acquaintance he met before taking his post in the US capital. “There are unconfirmed reports that the South Korean military operated ‘welfare centers’ all over South Vietnam during the war,” he recalled the friend telling him. “If it’s possible to support this with data from the US government, then that makes South Korea ‘perpetrators’ on the comfort women issue. If President Park Geun-hye and the South Korean public can regain their objectivity and approach the comfort women issue seriously, then the situation could change.”
Yamaguchi proceeded to track down White House and State Department diplomatic documents from the war through different branches of the NARA, as well as trial and crime records. In July 2014, the long and difficult process paid off when he finally located a letter sent to Gen. Chae Myeong-sin, the South Korean military’s first commander in Vietnam between 1965 and 1969, by the US military command stationed in Saigon (now Ho Chi Minh City). While it did not indicate the exact date the US military wrote it, Yamaguchi said the surrounding circumstances suggested it would have been written “between January and April 1969.”
According to the article, the letter makes reference to the illegal diversion of large amounts of US supplies by the South Korea military in Vietnam. One of the places mentioned as a backdrop for the crime was a “Turkish bath for South Korean troops” located in central Saigon. The letter also reportedly refers to “acts of prostitution taking place” and “Vietnamese women working” at the Turkish bath. “While it is a welfare center exclusively for South Korean troops, US troops are also able to make special use for a fee of US$38 per visit,” the letter is quoted as saying.
After inquiring with US veterans who were aware of the situation in Saigon at the time, Yamaguchi heard reports that the “Turkish bath” there was a prostitution facility, as well as accounts that “the Vietnamese women who worked at the facilities were all very young and came from farming villages.”
Concluding the piece, Yamaguchi writes, “If President Park Geun-hye truly sees the comfort women issue as a human rights issue rather than a tool for domestic politics and diplomacy . . . then she will take the lead in investigating [the allegations] as with the example of the South Korean comfort women. Otherwise, [South Korea] would be proving to the international community that it is a country that ignores truths that are inconvenient to itself and refuses to confront history.
Distasteful as it may be, the argument is also difficult to refute. Now it’s time for Seoul to sit down with Vietnamese authorities to find out the truth not only about the civilian massacres that took place during the Vietnam War, but also about the extent of military authorities’ involvement in operating and managing “welfare stations” for their troops – and to take appropriate follow-up action.
By Gil Yun-hyung, Tokyo correspondent

But, Korean demagogue continues… forever. And Koreans are kept being ignorant.

Section on alleged Japanese mass murder of ‘comfort women’ added to South Korean history textbook

FEB 1, 2017

The final version of South Korea’s state-issued middle school history textbook has added to a section about the history of a statue installed in front of the Japanese Embassy in Seoul representing “comfort women,” claiming that some were mass-murdered by fleeing Japanese troops.

An earlier version did not have the mass-murder description.

It also said that a citizens’ group has held rallies each Wednesday since 1992 to demand Japan resolve the issue of comfort women who were forced to provide sex for Japanese troops before and during World War II.

Additionally, the final version says the statue was installed in front of the embassy to mark the 1,000th rally by the group.

The added descriptions came after the education ministry solicited the public for opinions after the initial draft was released in November. The additions reflect an apparent call for stronger wordings on the comfort women issue.

And no one can stop it.

State-authored South Korean school textbooks say ‘comfort women’ forcibly mobilized, sexually assaulted

NOV 29, 2016

Drafts of state-authored history textbooks that the South Korean government plans to introduce next year highlight the wartime mobilization of Korean “comfort women” who were forced to work in Japanese military brothels, Lee Joon-sik, deputy prime minister and education minister, has announced.

The textbooks, Lee told a news conference, also clearly demonstrate human rights violations and the responsibility of the Japanese government on the comfort women issue.

The books, which will be for middle school students, defines comfort women as those who were forcibly mobilized by the Japanese government and military starting in the early 1930s and were sexually assaulted on a continuous basis, mainly at facilities set up and controlled by the Imperial Japanese Army.

The draft text for high school students calls comfort women “sex slaves” and says their human rights were violated.

The high school textbook also touches on the South Korean-Japanese dispute over the islands known in Japan as Takeshima and as Dokdo in South Korea. It says that though the Sea of Japan islands are explicitly South Korean territory, Tokyo continues to assert that they are its territory.

The text also notes the South Korean government’s position on the naming of the Sea of Japan, which it says should be called the East Sea.

The cases in which the area is also called the East Sea has been growing internationally, the book adds.

Related article I wrote 10 years ago.

Today’s “Comfort women” or prostitutes

Comfort women? sex slave?

“I’m Zapanese…”

A mistake of “The comfort women photo exhibition”

Diggin’ own grave: Rep. Mike Honda

Anti-Ignorance on Comfort Women

The U.S. “Sex Slave” resolution goin’ nowhere